Request a Free Estimate 647-500-5263

Tree Fertilizing

Plants are continuously using nutrients from the soil and often, to meet their nutritional requirements, it is necessary to add the nutrients back into the soil in the form of fertilizers. The experts at Greenbloom Landscape Design can help you select the right fertilizers for your needs to help your trees and plants grow to be healthy and beautiful.

Fertilizing Your Trees

  • Considerations Before You Fertilize
    • Ensure you are using the appropriate fertilizer to meet the needs of your plants.
    • Follow the manufacturer’s directions for application rates. More is not better.
    • If you want to remain organic, there are several organic fertilizers available. If you focus on building soil health with organic matter, it will help deliver sufficient nutrients.
    • Knowing the type of soil in your garden (sandy, clay-based, poor nutrients) will help you determine the fertilizer you need.
    • If you have a wide variety of trees and shrubs, you may wish to opt for an all-purpose fertilizer.
    • Trees and shrubs in urban settings are under more stress due to the challenging environment. There is low moisture availability, soil compaction, nearby construction, and competition from other plants. Fertilizer helps to reduce these stresses.
    • For newly planted trees, use a starter fertilizer and keep them watered.
    • Keep areas around the trees free of weeds to minimize competition for water and nutrients, thereby minimizing stress.
  • Understanding Fertilizer
    • The letters represent the elements, Nitrogen, Phosphorous, and Potassium
    • Nitrogen promotes growth above the ground such as green, leafy foliage and lush lawns.
    • Phosphorous promotes growth below ground (good root systems). It also promotes the production of flowers and fruits.
    • Potassium promotes overall plant health.
    • The numbers on the bags represent the percentage of each element.
    • Starter fertilizers for new lawns and transplanting will have a higher middle number, as that is good for helping trees fight environmental stresses.
    • Fertilizers with a higher middle number are used to promote good root development and flower production.
    • A simple way to remember what each element does is to think of the phrase “above, below, and all around.”
  • Fertilizer Application
    • It is best to apply fertilizer in the spring when the ground is workable, and just before the trees start growing. This is usually around late April or early May.
    • Spread the fertilizer evenly over each plant’s entire root zone.
    • Tree and shrub fertilizer comes in granular (shake and feed or slow release), liquid, or spike fertilizers.
    • Deep root fertilization is another method of application in which a nutrient solution is injected into the root zone of the trees. The nutrients are under pressure, which helps to aerate the root system as well.
  • Indicators of When Fertilizer May Be Necessary
    • A soil test indicates your land is deficient in certain materials
    • If new shoot growth remains between 2-6 inches, fertilizer may be needed. If the growth remains under 2 inches, it is likely that an application will be beneficial. In this instance, a fertilizer high in nitrogen will help.
    • If the leaves of your plants are yellow or off-coloured, this could indicate that the tree is not taking up enough nutrients. Be aware that some trees naturally have discoloured leaves. Adding chelated iron to your soil will help.
    • If the yard was fertilized regularly, the trees will rarely need additional applications.
  • Specific Plant Needs
    • Evergreens require fertilizer that is high in nitrogen, as they keep their leaves or needles all year. They grow best in acidic soil, so be sure to choose a fertilizer specific to acid-loving plants.
    • Rhododendrons and azaleas also do well with acidic fertilizer, and calcium is another important aspect to ensure good growth.
    • Clematis should be fertilized with low nitrogen fertilizer in the spring when they have buds of approximately 2”. Heavy feeders can continue to be fertilized with a balanced fertilizer after flowering until the later summer or using a clematis specific fertilizer.
    • Roses require fertilization when there is about 4-6 inches of growth and the leaves have started to grow, and there is no concern of frost. Roses are heavy feeders. They also require calcium, magnesium, sulfur, boron, copper, iron manganese, and zinc. You should stop fertilizing approximately 8 weeks before your area is to receive its first frost.
  • Mistakes to Avoid
    • Never pour all of your fertilizer in one spot.
    • Do not leave fertilizer on the foliage as it can cause chemical burns on the leaves.
    • Stakes or spikes are not the best choice for fertilization.
    • Do not fertilize in the late summer or early fall, as you don’t want to encourage new growth before the frost arrives or the tree or shrub is preparing to go dormant.
    • Do not exceed the recommended usage. More is not better.
    • Do not fertilize during drought conditions or when water is unavailable, as the plant may not be able to absorb the nutrients.
    • Never fertilize any plant that is stressed from drought or disease.

We Provide Free Estimates

Request a Free Estimate

We Provide Free Estimates 647-500-5263

Request Estimate

Check Our Service Areas

Check Our Service Areas

 

Seasonal Packages & Promotions

Seasonal Packages & Promotions

Seasonal Packages & Promotions

CLICK HERE

Request a Free Estimate

Captcha Security
Submit